Cooking for my baby

Baby Bullet Blog

The Homemade Baby Food Recipes

Tasty new homemade baby food recipes, feeding tips, baby related news, safety recalls, updates to our site and more!
  • Baby’s Blueberry and Apple Puree

    I’ve yet to meet the baby who doesn’t like blueberries! And these juicy little fruits don’t just taste delicious, they are absolutely packed with goodness for your tiny diner.

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  • Cheesy Vegetable Omelet for Baby

    Once your baby is safely enjoying eggs there are so many yummy foods you can start preparing for him – and the humble omelet is one of our favorites! Omelets are quick and easy to make

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  • Baby’s Loaded Sweet Potato with Peanut Butter Topping

    This recipe combines sweet potato, banana and natural peanut butter to create a delicious treat for your baby, but one that’s healthy too! Whilst sweet potato is brimming with beta-carotene

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  • The Best Way to Organize Your Herbs and Spices

    If, like us, you love to cook, then chances are you struggle to organize all the pots and packets containing your herbs and spices! We’ve tried just about every option – those nice

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  • Potato Pancakes for Baby

    If your little one likes to feed himself, he’ll just love these potato pancakes! They have a lovely soft, smooth texture so they’re very easy for him to manage and a subtle flavour

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At Home With Natalie

Celebrate Motherhood

Your kid is finally old enough to eat actual food - yay! Fundamental ground rules.

Creating your own baby food is simple, quick, and saves money. Be conscious of common allergens and gas-inducing foods. Pick organic produce when possible. And, eventually, be sure that the foods you are producing are age appropriate.

Protect Your Child From Pesticides In Food

These basic advances recommended by house cleaning services Baltimore, MD can enormously decrease the measure of pesticides in your family's food:
Strip products of the soil, and evacuate the external leaves of vegetables like lettuce and cabbage.
Scour (under running water) all leafy foods that you don't strip. Cleaning items explicitly intended to wash produce may likewise help.
A few nourishments – like strawberries, grapes, broccoli, lettuce, and spinach – are increasingly hard to wash. Drench these quickly, at that point flush.
Pick produce without shape, wounding, and rot. These are probably going to hold more pesticides.
Cut back the excess off meat and expel the skin from poultry. Pesticides (and other ecological synthetic concoctions) are frequently amassed in the fat and skin of poultry, meat, and fish.
Think about purchasing natural produce, particularly nourishments your kid eats a great deal of or things on the "Messy Dozen" list (beneath).
Search for privately developed produce. Leafy foods that are become far away require after-reap pesticides and waxes to assist them with enduring the long excursion. Furthermore, produce that needs to travel is frequently picked before aging, which decreases flavor just as supplements.
Purchase produce in season. In spite of the fact that it appears to be a treat to purchase delicious, red strawberries or tomatoes in the dead of winter, remember that food become unavailable generally originates from another side of the equator. Once more, this produce will be picked before and likely contain more pesticides.
Serve a wide assortment of food, particularly produce. A differed diet limits rehashed utilization of a similar pesticide.
This rundown of the products of the soil with the most noteworthy – and least – levels of pesticide buildup depends on test results from the United States Department of Agriculture.
Starting at 2019, these are the 12 products of the soil with the most significant levels of pesticide buildup: strawberries, spinach, kale, nectarines, apples, grapes, peaches, fruits, pears, tomatoes, celery, and potatoes.
These had the most minimal degrees of pesticide buildup: avocados, sweet corn, pineapples, solidified sweet peas, onions, papayas, eggplants, asparagus, kiwis, cabbages, cauliflower, melons, broccoli, mushrooms, and honeydew melons.
This doesn't imply that you have to restrict apples from your shopping basket, yet you might not have any desire to depend on them exclusively to meet your kid's natural product prerequisites. Acquaint your kid with a wide range of sorts of organic product, incorporating those with low pesticide buildup, similar to kiwi and papaya. What's more, when you do serve apples that aren't natural, wash them completely or strip them.